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Deputies received a call from Todd Harrell’s wife after an argument allegedly took a physical turn.

The former bassist for the Grammy-nominated rock band 3 Doors Down has been jailed on drug, firearms and domestic violence charges after police in Mississippi responded to a call from his wife about an argument.

The Sheriff’s Department in Jackson County issued a statement on June 15 that stated that Robert “Todd” Harrell, 46, was in an adult detention center after being arrested at his home in St. Martin; deputies who responded to the call found guns and drugs at the home, which prompted a warrant to search the residence.

Harrell, a founding member of 3 Doors Down, served two years in prison and a six-year probation term for a charge of vehicular homicide in 2013.

In the press release, Jackson County Sheriff Mike Ezell wrote that deputies came to the Harrells’ home after the wife called them to report that the couple’s argument had taken a physical turn.

Upon arrival, the deputies saw both drugs and guns in the home, and contacted narcotics unit officers with the South Mississippi Metro Enforcement Team to obtain a search warrant for the residence. 

Harrell was subsequently arrested and charged for possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, which carries felony charges, as well as the misdemeanor charges of possession of a controlled substance and domestic violence/simple assault. He is also wanted in Tennessee for a probation violation.

As of June 15, Harrell was jailed with no bond and awaiting an initial court hearing. It is unknown if Harrell has legal representation.

Harrell helped to found the Mississippi-based 3 Doors Down in 1996, but drug and alcohol use led to an arrest for public intoxication in 1999 and charges of driving under the influence in 2012 before the accident in 2013 that claimed the life of Paul Shoulders Jr. in Nashville, Tennessee.

He was subsequently dismissed from the band and went on to incur another DUI charge in 2014 before his sentencing in 2015. He was sentenced to five years in prison, but served two, and received six years’ probation upon his release.

In 2017, Harrell told a group of students and participants from a faith-based community service program that the accident had changed his life. “Having everything at your fingertips. Fame. We had it all,” he said. “[The accident] took who I was and just turned me upside down.”

View the original article at thefix.com

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