Morning Roundup: Mar. 13, 2019

Prizes to reward recovery work in some programs, LGBTQ musician Ryan Cassata shares recovery, no-frills therapy attracts men who need mental health support.

Charlotte Church: I Did Dry January and February—And Waved Goodbye to Hangxiety [Guardian]
The singer-songwriter explains her decision to cut down on drinking. “I just don’t want to deal with the hangxiety any more: the creeping panic, the shame, the guilt.”

‘Our Goal is to Halve the Male Suicide Rate’: Why No-Frills Therapy Works for Men [Guardian]
Men who normally would not feel comfortable discussing their mental state are finding new outlets to do so. These support groups cater to mostly working-class, middle-aged men with its straightforward, no-frills format. 

Wendy Williams Starts Substance Abuse Hotline: ‘We Must All Come Together’ [AOL]
Through her family’s foundation, TV personality Wendy Williams has launched a 24-hour helpline—giving people a chance to connect with recovery services.

From Dropout and Inmate to Masters’ Degrees: How 2 Dayton Men Turned Their Lives Around [Dayton Daily News]
With decades of sobriety between them, two men share their journeys from rock bottom to redemption. They now work together to help the people they once were.

Cut Down on Drinking to Help Detoxify Your Body [EcoWatch]
Number one on the list ‘9 Ways to Help Your Body Detoxify’ is to limit alcohol. “Drinking too much alcohol reduces your liver’s ability to carry out its normal functions, such as detoxifying.”

Coroner: California College Student Died from Alcohol [Bradenton Herald]
Alcohol is the cause in the death of a Southern California college student. The first-year student had a blood alcohol level of 0.331. 

LGBTQ Musician Ryan Cassata Releases ‘Jupiter,’ Conquers Addiction, Offers Support [Rainbow Times]
The song ‘Jupiter’ was Ryan Cassata’s key to becoming sober later in life. As a member of the LGBTQ community, the artist was disproportionately affected by substance abuse.

Opinion: Earning Prizes for Fighting an Addiction [NY Times]
Substance abuse programs in Canada and the U.S. have seen success by rewarding those who stay sober. Prizes include cash rewards and job opportunities.

View the original article at thefix.com

Wed, March 13, 2019| The Fix|In Addiction News

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